Roman History in a Nutshell: The Pyrrhic Wars – Sicily and The Battle of Beneventum, 275 BCE

We left off after the (potential) defeat of the Romans after the Battle of Asculum and the role of Roman/Carthaginian relations in proceedings. Well those relations were about to be tested for the flimsy trans-Mediterranean partnership that it actually was. We have spoken how it seems Pyrrhus may have had eyes on Sicily. The GreekContinue reading “Roman History in a Nutshell: The Pyrrhic Wars – Sicily and The Battle of Beneventum, 275 BCE”

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Roman History in a Nutshell: The Pyrrhic Wars – Carthage and the Battle of Asculum, 279 BCE

A look at the middle portion of Rome’s wars with the Kingdom of Epirus under Pyrrhus. The involvement of Carthage makes the whole affair very interesting, and while Rome appears to keep losing, they do so whilst giving Pyrrhus and his forces a solid effort and taking out some key troops and generals. How long can Pyrrhus hold out fighting the Romans? What exactly will Carthaginian involvement be and where will this lead?

Portus Lemanis: The Forgotten Saxon Shore Fort

A sad look at forgotten history as we discuss the significant Roman remains laying unexcavated, untouched, in private land, barely accessible to people without trespassing, at Portus Lemanis. Near modern Hythe and Lympne. At one point a significant Saxon Shore Fort and Port for the Classis Britannica, the Romano-British navy.

Roman History in a Nutshell – The Samnite Wars ~343 BCE – ~290 BCE

A look at Rome’s wars with the Samnites, a central italian group mainly populating the Apenning region. These wars would lead to Rome’s first direct control of Grecian culture, via Neapolis, as well as pushing their boundaries closer to the Greek and Carthaginian superpowers.

We Lack Discipline Watches: Domina

WARNING: Whilst I have attempted to be spoiler-free I promise nothing. It’s rare a TV series about Rome happens without my attention. Being a humble peasant lad we didn’t just have copies of Ovid laying around the house, or Virgil on the shelves. We didn’t sit around the hearth and read Livy’s histories to eachContinue reading “We Lack Discipline Watches: Domina”

Roman History in a Nutshell: Introduction

I am not an historian. In fact I never particularly liked history as a topic. I do find a lot of people develop more of an interest the older they get and the more they become some part of it. I’ve got a videogame collection I am fairly certain in a couple of generations youngstersContinue reading “Roman History in a Nutshell: Introduction”

The Pleb Who Built Rome: Marcus Agrippa

We Lack Discipline talks one of their absolute heroes of Rome, the friend of Augustus and hard-working General, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. We discuss his life and his works, his role in shaping the Pantheon and why he was fundamental to the founding of the Principate and Imperial Rome.

The Mother of Rome? Livia Drusilla

How better to celebrate International Women’s Day than with a profile and analysis of one of the most important figures in Roman Imperial History – Livia Drusilla – The Diva Augusta and wife of Augustus.

The Fan-Tas-Tic Virtues of Rome

Content Warning: This article features discussion on suicide. Should you be experiencing suicidal thoughts please contact a local mental health service or suicide prevention service as soon as possible. Virtue – meaning a sort of essence of goodness, a moral righteousness. Generally it is considered a positive thing but one could be accused of ‘virtueContinue reading “The Fan-Tas-Tic Virtues of Rome”

Modern Things Romans Would Love #1: Social Media (especially Instagram and Twitter)

It is quite funny that actors in Roman society were considered only a step above prostitutes. Indeed many actors ran a side business as prostitutes, so bereft of opportunities, and funds, they were in acting. I say it is funny because to an extent all Roman life was an act, an elaborate performance. If youContinue reading “Modern Things Romans Would Love #1: Social Media (especially Instagram and Twitter)”